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Helicopter and Plane Crash Lawyer

editor photo

Editor: James T. Crouse
Profession: Aviation Accident Attorney

August 30, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed In Maryland Helicopter Crash

Category: Helicopter Crash Lawsuits

The husband of a medical technician killed when a Maryland State Police helicopter crashed in September 2008 has filed a $7 million wrongful death lawsuit against the federal government.

In March, relatives of the paramedic on board filed a $15 million lawsuit.

A personal injury claim for $50 million was filed by the only survivor of the crash only to have the FAA deny the claim. How can this be? This automobile crash victim survived the initial trauma of the car crash, thought all was well when rescued by a helicopter heading for treatment. Then comes the second - and totally unanticiapted - severe trauma of the helicopter crash which killed all onboard - including a friend, the other car accident victim. Frieda is certain if the crash was severe enough to kill four out of five people, the only survivor had plenty of injuries (not to mention the mental and emotional trauma) for a lawsuit - and the FAA refused it?

The helicopter was en route from a traffic accident to a hospital when it was diverted to Andrews Air Force Base because of bad weather. The pilot had trouble with the foggy weather as he was trying to land and radioed for help twice before crashing 3 miles from the base. His calls for help were never answered by the air traffic controllers.

The lawsuit claims "negligence" on the part of the Federal Aviation Administration air traffic controllers.

August 23, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Family Files Wrongful Death Lawsuit In Tesla Motor Co. Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crash Lawsuits

The family of a Tesla Motors employee who died in a plane crash in East Palo Alto has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the pilot's estate.

The parents of the 31-year-old Tesla electrical engineer died in February when the Cessna 310 in which he was a passenger hit high-tension power lines and a 60 foot transmission tower shortly after takeoff. The plane's owner/pilot and a senior manager at the electrical car manufacturer were also killed in the crash.

The lawsuit accuses the pilot of negligence for taking off in heavy fog. Air traffic controllers warned the pilot twice that because of the heavy fog, taking off was "at his own risk." Shortly after takeoff, the pilot banked left instead of right as he had been instructed by the controllers.

NTSB has not released a final report concerning the plane crash.

Frieda wonders why general aviation pilots don't take threatening inclement weather seriously and don't heed air traffic controllers' warnings. How many lives would be saved if this were the case?

August 20, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Family Files Wrongful Death Lawsuit In Tesla Motor Co. Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crash Lawsuits

The family of a Tesla Motors employee who died in a plane crash in East Palo Alto has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the pilot's estate.

The parents of the 31-year-old Tesla electrical engineer died in February when the Cessna 310 in which he was a passenger hit high-tension power lines and a 60 foot transmission tower shortly after takeoff. The plane's owner/pilot and a senior manager at the electrical car manufacturer were also killed in the crash.

The lawsuit accuses the pilot of negligence for taking off in heavy fog. Air traffic controllers warned the pilot twice that because of the heavy fog, taking off was "at his own risk." Shortly after takeoff, the pilot banked left instead of right as he had been instructed by the controllers.

Frieda wonders why pilots continue to take chances with their lives, the lives of their passengers and people on the ground - remember, he was warned twice by the air traffic controllers. The plane hit a home where a day care center operated and other houses and cars on the street. Luckily, no one one the ground was hurt.

NTSB has not released a final report concerning the plane crash.

May 18, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Cockpit Fire Forces United Airlines Plane To Make Emergency Landing

Category: Aviation Safety

United Airlines Flight 27 from New York to Los Angeles made an emergency landing at Virginia's Dulles International on Sunday due to a fire in the cockpit. The fire was extinguished prior to landing and no injuries were reported.

For a long time, the Boeing 757 has had known problems with the heating system in a cockpit window and investigators are looking into whether this was a factor in the fire.

One of the passengers, sitting in the second row, stated she smelled smoke about 30 minutes into the flight and then the cockpit door opened and the captain requested a fire extinguisher. The first cabin filled with smoke.

After landing at Dulles, the passengers remained seated until a firefighter came on board to open the cockpit door. Once the door was open, the passengers were able to see the windshield was completely cracked and shattered.

The NTSB is investigating to determine it this incident was due to a recurring problem involved in previous 757 cockpit fires, or a new issue. In 2007, the NTSB recommended to the FAA that airlines be required to replace the heat terminal block on all Boeing 747s, 757s, 767s, and 777s.

In March of 2008, the FAA proposed a rule that gave airlines a choice of regularly inspecting the heat terminal blocks or replacing then - the Boeing 747 was not included in the FAA proposed order. The airlines strongly opposed the order and it hasn't been made final even though the FAA said in 2008 it was aware of nine incidents of electrical arcing at the terminal blocks and "more than one incident" of open flames.

So Frieda wonders who exactly is in charge? The NTSB recommends changes which will add to aviation safety based on their accident investigations - the FAA will eventually get around to considering these recommendations and sometimes proposes a rule - the airline rejects the rule and it sits on a desk at the FAA gathering dust, not being acted upon. This makes no sense.

Frieda's thinking this is similar to a parent telling a child, "I know it's dangerous when you do 'so and so', so I'm considering not allowing you to that, the child pitches a fit, the parent then shelves the idea and the child is left alone to do as he/she wishes. Sound familiar?

All planes made since 2005 have used a different wiring system which Boeing is confident has solved the problem.

April 09, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Plane Crash Which Killed DJ AM Caused By Underinflated Tires

Category: Plane Crashes

The National Transportation Board has concluded the 2008 plane crash which killed four people and left Travis Barker and the late DJ AM injured was caused by underinflated tires.

All four tires exploded as the plane raced down the runway for takeoff. The pilot (with only 35 hours in this plane) then tried to abort takoff, but due to sensors in the plane, that was impossible and the plane burst into flames after hitting an embankment.

Tires should be changed after eight days if proper maintenance has not been carried out. This Learjet's tires had not been checked for three weeks prior to the tragic flight. The investigation found operators of charter flights aren't aware of how quickly tires can lose pressure and that the FAA and Learjet Inc. didn't take aggressive enough action to fix a design flaw on this model of jet following a similar accident in 2001. Now that's a shocker!

Proper maintenance is crucial to flight safety - no item is too small when dealing with people's lives. NTSB Chairwoman, Deborah Hersman, stated, "This accident didn't need to happen."

The families of Travis Barker and Charles Still have settled with several companies over the accident and AM's estate settled a $20 million lawsuit in January.

February 11, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Widows Call For Pro-Active Helicopter Safety

Category: Helicopter Crashes

Three widows whose husbands were killed in a helicopter crash March 12, 2009 are asking for a more pro-active approach of helicopter safety, not a reactive one. The offshore workers, who died when the Cougar helicopter crashed, did not have to lose their lives that morning - the crash was preventable say their widows.

On January 20, 2009, Sikorsky issued an alert service bulletin advising specific titanium mounting studs be replaced with steel studs. Failure to do so could result in oil leaking out of the gear box. Minutes before the crash, the pilot of Cougar Flight 491 reported an oil-pressure problem. Cougar Helicopters flies offshore workers to and from the oilfields off Newfoundland.

The company has testified the alert bulletin was reviewed and the ordered parts began to arrive on March 13 - the day after the crash.

The three widows testified at an inquiry into the crash and stated they feel the company should have waited until after the bolts were replaced before flying the helicopters, especially after a helicopter was forced to land in July of 2008 due to the same problem.

There was only one survivor in the March helicopter crash. Taking the time to fix this inexpensive part or thoroughly checking the bolts - where there was a known problem - before leaving for the offshore sight could have saved the lives of these men. Why wasn't either done?


February 02, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Safety Reform Slow After Buffalo Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crashes

On February 12, 2009, 50 people died in a fiery plane crash near Buffalo, N.Y. as a result of the pilots of the regional airliner making critical errors. Almost a year later, safety reforms have not been implemented even though Federal regulators and lawmakers promised quick action immediately following the plane crash.

The crash brought to light a safety gap between the major airlines and the regional carriers. Some of the concerns are fatigue among the pilots of low-fare airlines, long-distance commutes and inadequate training. Pilot performance has been a factor in three of the last six fatal domestic airline accidents involving regional carriers. Investigators have determined the cause of the Buffalo crash to be primarily the errors made by the pilots.

The Washington Post reports the National Transportation Safety Board is meeting to determine the probable cause of the N.Y. crash and to make safety recommendations, stating the safety issues raised by the crash go beyond the pilots' mistakes.

The House has passed legislation to force the FAA to strengthen regulations, but action has been slowed by unrelated Senate disputes.

This does not surprise Frieda. Of course, there is no reason why the FAA can't do the right thing and create the safety reform without being forced to do so by legislation. Then there are the airlines which could improve their safety training. Improving the safety of trusting passengers should be more important than risking lives in order to save money.

January 12, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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United Airlines Airbus 319 Landing Gear Collapses at Newark

Category: Plane Crashes

As the industry questions the cause of the landing gear malfunction at Newark Liberty International Airport, no injuries have been reported.

The passengers had to crouch down in their seats and prepare for a crash landing. The crew was able to bring the airliner to a safe belly landing and all 48 passengers and 5 crew members slid down emergency chutes to safety once the plane came to a stop. Some passengers report the landing was smoother that other landings they have experienced at Newark.

The trouble became apparent when Flight 634 from Chicago was on its descent to the Newark airport. The passengers were aware of trouble when the plane pulled up and started to circle the airport instead of landing. The pilot then announced there was a problem with the landing gear and they should brace themselves for a crash.

An investigation is underway.

Frieda is pleased to know there are pilots whose composure during an emergency saves lives. That being said, she eagerly awaits the results of the investigation - such as the maintenance history on the aircraft. Is this area one where the airlines cutting costs in an attempt to save money?

January 04, 2010

By Frieda Flyer

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Northwest Airlines Brand Will Soon Be Gone

Category: Airline Travel

Delta Airlines has received the single operating certificate from the FAA allowing it to phase out the Northwest name. The process is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2010.

In October, 2008, Delta acquired Northwest and became the world's largest airline.

It is on that date in 2008, Frieda's traveling experience changed forever. Northwest is the only airlines Frieda uses and in her opinion, nothing good has happened to Northwest since Delta took over the airline.
Now Frieda knows no airline is perfect and there are those of you who have had trouble with Northwest - Frieda's experience has been nothing but pleasant.

There is one route Frieda travels several times a year - a route which was previously thoroughly enjoyed. Since that date in 2008, when Delta came on the scene, this has not been the case. Among the many differences is the size of the plane - it's so small one can hardly stand up when boarding. Customer service has changed too - the agents remain polite while being relatively useless under Delta's reign. Trying to book a flight online, checking in, and attempting to book using air miles Delta's website is much more user unfriendly than Northwest's.

Speaking of air miles . . .one changed that has already taken place - and the most annoying Frieda has found so far - is the combination of the frequent-flyer for both airlines into Delta's SkyMiles. In the past, using frequent flyer miles through Northwest has been smooth and easy. Not so with Delta's SkyMiles. Trying to use air miles gained under Northwest is the most frustrating experience Frieda has ever encountered. One can no longer use half miles and half credit card under Delta's rules. . . unless one has the Delta American Express Credit Card. No other card will do - it has to be Delta's card for which one pays a fee. Ridiculous!

A very nice agent explained this credit card policy to Frieda when she was trying to book her holiday flights. The tone of the agent's voice was so empathetic, Frieda asked if she was originally Delta or Northwest. She said she was originally with Northwest. Frieda then expressed her sympathies to the agent for what Delta has done to Northwest. Her response? "Thank you, I appreciate that."

So, it is with a heavy heart Frieda bids farewell to Northwest Airlines and its management. Traveling with you has been a pleasure - you will be missed.

November 30, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Dangers At Newark Airport

Category: Aviation Safety


The unsafe landing procedures have been revealed at New Jersey's Newark Airport because the air traffic controllers who cared more about passenger safety than their jobs.

The controllers knew that landing planes on intersecting runways at the same time risked lives and when the FAA ignored them, they turned to the news media for help. All they wanted the FAA to do was to help them do their job - to keep airplanes from colliding. Even after several close calls, the FAA tried to keep the controllers quiet, accused of caring more about capacity than safety.

The Department of Transportation Inspector General confirmed the landing on intersecting runways at Newark created "unnecesary flight hazards" and faults the FAA for being slow to respond. New Jersey Congressman Chris Smith states the slow response to prevent a catastreophe could have killed hundreds if not thousands. The Office of Special Counsel blasted the FAA for not going far enough an for allowing "a potential danger to the flying public to persist."

The FAA plans to start up an automated system to help air traffic controllers separate plane on intersectind runways on December 14th.

Is it possible to get the FAA to do their job without a public whistleblower? Frieda wonders what other dangers are lurking which threaten our lives.

November 17, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Zoned Airspace Goes Into Effect Over The Hudson

Category: Helicopter Crashes

On Thursday, November 19, a long needed "exclusionary zone" over the Hudson River in New York City goes into effect. The new "zone" system separates the airspace for helicopters and seaplanes from the airspace for other aircrafrt flying over the Hudson, reports rotor & wing.

VFR aircraft which operate under the rules of air traffic control will operate above 1,300 feet while lower flying aircraft using visual flight rules will fly between 1,000 feet and 1,300 feet and use the same radio frequency used by aircraft flying below 1,000 feet.

A congested air space for too long is finally getting the changes needed to make flying safer. Sadly, these changes come after nine people died in a helicopter-plane midair on August 8 of this year.

November 10, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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What's Going On With Delta?

Category: Airline Travel

Delta Airlines has just not had a good week. Frieda has not had a good week with Delta.

On November 7, a plane heading to Philadelphia had to return to the gate due to an engine fire. Airport fire trucks responded immediately and all 138 passengers were quickly evacuated. The good news is no one was hurt and the passengers were put on another flight to their destination later that same day - hopefully one without the fireworks.

Just the day before the engine fire, an engine tail cone came off a Delta airlines Boeing 777 jet shortly after takeoff, plummeted thousands of feet and landing in someone's yard. An FAA spokesman stated the jet doesn't need the part to fly and the passengers weren't in any danger. Well, that's good news. However, what about the danger to those of us at home or out working in the yard or walking our dog? The part weighed 20 pounds and was 4 feet long and 3 feet in diameter - a size that would have killed someone if it hit them after falling thousands of feet. Luckily this did not happen. No one noticed when the part fell off and the flight continued safely to Tokyo with 221 passengers and crew members on board.

Now, with these two incidents happening so soon after the NWA airlines missed the Minneapolis airport because they were busy on their laptops, Frieda wonders just what exactly is going on with Delta (NWA is now part of Delta as you may know). Not only do they seem to be slipping on maintenance and therefore, our safety, they are definitely very "consumer friendly".

Not only are we, their "meal ticket" so to speak, being choked and choked by any and every additional fee they can think of to throw at us, just try using any accumulated mileage credit for a flight. Last year, Frieda used some of her Frequent Flyer miles from NWA to lower the cost of her ticket for the holidays - a pleasant and easy experience. Frieda used a credit card and saved half the cost of her ticket. This week Frieda tried to do the same thing this year, flying the exact same route and dates flown last year. Well, my Frequent Flyer miles from NWA have now been turned to Sky Miles from Delta. The new "gotcha" is these miles can't be used to lower the cost of the ticket unless Frieda uses a Delta American Express credit card! Frieda doesn't have a Delta American Express. No other card will do - only Delta's card - and we have yet another way to squeeze the flying public. Even if Frieda applied for and used a Delta American Express card, Frieda would not have the same economic friendly experience she had using her mileage last year with NWA. The American public and air miles are being held hostage by the airline!

Just what is going on with the airline - in these instances, Delta in particular? What is the extra money they receive from all these fees going towards? Certainly not maintenance and competency nor consumer satisfaction! What other industry in the country would we still patronize if we kept getting one surcharge and fee after another, yet received questionable safety standards and unfriendly service?

Of course, Delta is investigating the two aircraft instances. Perhaps it's time Delta investigates their policies on how they treat their flying public or those they supposedly serve need to investigate Delta.

November 05, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Mother Sues In Daughter's Helicopter Death

Category: Helicopter Crashes

The mother of an Oklahoma woman who died last month in a helicopter crash has filed suit against the pilot's estate, his parents, the helicopter manufacturer, the owner of the helicopter and five unknown men, reports the Tahlequah Daily Press.

The crash of the Robinson R-22 in mid-October killed her daughter and the 26-year-old pilot. The suit alleges the pilot negligently operated the aircraft which caused the injuries that led to her daughter's death. The pilot's parents are listed because they had control over the helicopter and allowed their son to fly the chopper, knowing he had "reckless flying habits." Robinson Helicopter Co. is accused of negligent design of the R-22 which made it "defective and unreasonably dangerous."

A judgment of $10,000 from each defendant is sought in the case.

Not knowing much about the R-22, Frieda decided to check out what the knowledgeable people had to say about this machine. Although there were sighted some room for improvement, Frieda did not find any article stating it is a defective or dangerous aircraft. In a report dated January, 2008, the Robinson R-22 is called the "darling of flight schools" everywhere. Stating the craft is remarkably reliable and maintenance-free the writer adds the majority of the accidents are due to pilot error, and the R-22 is not forgiving of pilot error.

October 24, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Northwest Flight 188 to MN or WI?

Category: Aviation News

Frieda is sure that by now we all know about Northwest Flight 188 flying from San Diego, CA to Minneapolis, MN and totally missed the Minneapolis-St.Paul airport on October 21, crossing the state line into Wisconsin. Somehow, the pilots missed all attempts by Air Traffic Controllers to get their attention, forgot to fly the airplane, yet claim they were not asleep.

The Airbus A320 had 144 passengers and five crew members on board. The pilots claim "they were in a heated discussion over airline policy and they lost situational awareness." Experts seem to doubt this account of what happened, doubting they could have been distracted for that long - an hour and 20 minutes.
The controllers were so concerned, the Air National Guard fighters were ready to intercept and investigate the situation because of the lengthy time without contact. Contact was made with the pilots before the fighters were deployed.

Of course this incident has the FAA and the NTSB's attention. Another look at scheduling for pilots and pilot fatigue is definitely on the agenda. The voice recorder on the A320 probably won't be much help since it's on a 30-minute loop which means it records over itself every 30 minutes and this excursion lasted almost 3 times that long. This also raises the question of replacing the shorter loop voice recorders with the new 2 hour ones.

If sleeping on the job is found to be a factor in this incident, it will be the first one for commercial aviation - or at least the first one we know about. In 2008 a pilot of a Go!Airline jet fell asleep for 18 minutes on a flight from Honolulu to Hilo, Hawaii. The plane landed safely but the pilot was fired.

Frieda doesn't care if the pilots were asleep or in a heated discussion. Frieda does care that their job of flying the aircraft full of passengers and crew members safely to its destination was not their priority. Whatever the reason, their negligence put lives at risk. The airlines are so quick to find ways to nickel and dime its passengers on every flight - added fees that don't seem to improve our safety and our service. It's time the airlines are called to task.

October 20, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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New Rules For Pilots After Buffalo Crash

Category: Plane Crashes

The House has overwhelmingly approved new rules for pilots of commuter planes operated by regional carriers. In response to the Cogan Air flight in February which killed 50 people when the plane's engine stalled and crashed into a house.

The bill would require these pilots to have at least 1,500 hours of flight experience (instead of the current 250) and would require the pilots to be trained to deal with flight emergencies. This last one has left Frieda speechless - why isn't being trained in flight emergencies already a requirement?

When the NTSB investigated the crash, they found numerous deficiencies in regulations covering regional carriers and made recommendations to the FAA. The FAA is not required to adopt the NTSB's recommendations, a policy that surprised Rep. Louise Slaughter. The House legislation would eliminate the possibility the FAA would "shelve" these recommendations. The FAA not acting on recommendations from the NTSB - shocker!

Under this legislation, the FAA would have 90 days after final enactment of the bill to establish a national database of pilot licenses and safety records for airlines to use for hiring purposes. The FAA will have one year to update and to implement a new rule on number of hours a pilot can work in order to reduce pilot fatigue. Passengers who book flights on the internet would also be advised if a flight segment is being flown by a regional partner or by a major carrier.

When lives are at stake, it amazes Frieda that the FAA is so lax in their regulations and safety standards. Why do we need the House to propose a bill to force the FAA to do what it should be doing all along - being a safety advocate for us, the passengers who trust the airline industry with our lives each time we board an aircraft? Why does it take a tragedy to bring light to deficiencies that shouldn't have been allowed to exist at all?

It seems the bottom line for this industry isn't our safety afterall.

October 05, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed In Helicopter Crash

Category: Helicopter Crash Lawsuits

The family of a 46-year-old man who died three years ago when the Robinson Helicopter R44 he was flying crashed, has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Robinson Helicopter Co. and some of its suppliers, reports the News Tribune of Tacoma, Washington.

The children of the pilot claim the aircraft was poorly designed "defective and unsafe" - the reason the helicopter crashed. It was purchased new only a few months before the fatal crash.

On Oct. 8, 2006 the helicopter crashed into Lake Tapps, just before the pilot was to land at his lakefront home. He was killed in the crash and the sole passenger was severely injured. Witnesses reported hearing popping or clanking sounds coming from the helicopter before it crashed.

The NTSB ruled the crash was caused by "the complete loss of engine power, for undetermined reasons" and the pilot's loss of control of the helicopter after the power loss." The lawsuit contends the R44's engine was defective - especially the carburetor.

With 28 years of experience in aviation law, including handling crashes internationally, Crouse Law Offices in Raleigh, N.C. will be able to handle your concerns competently and efficiently. The successful career of Crouse Law Offices has gained them the respect of major law firms and large aviation manufacturers.

If you or a loved one has been injured or killed in a helicopter or plane incident, please call us at 919-861-0500 or contact us online for a free review of your case.

October 01, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Plane Crash Caused By Pilot's Blackout

Category: Plane Crashes

A fatal plane crash in Indiana on Wednesday is thought to be caused by the 43-year-old pilot suffering from hypoxia - a lack of oxygen. The plane was a single-engine propeller M20M Mooney registered to David Eyde, who has ownership interest in Eyde Co., a Lansing-based real estate development company.

Pilots flying F-16s were sent to intercept the erratically flying plane, and reported the plane crashed on its own. Pilots must use oxygen when flying above 12,500 feet for over 30 minutes in order to prevent hypoxia. Controllers in Indianapolis reported the plane had been circling with the pilot slumped over in the seat at about 25,000 feet. A pilot can become incapacitated at that altitude in only 3 minutes. Air traffic controllers in Minneapolis had given the pilot permission to fly at 25,000 feet, suggesting the pilot knowingly flew to that altitude and then lost consciousness.

In 1999, the plane carrying pro golfer Payne Stewart crashed killing Stewart and four others as a result of everyone on board losing consciousness from lack of oxygen after a loss in cabin pressure.

October 01, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Medical Helicopter Crash In S.C. Kills Three

Category: Helicopter Crashes

The American Eurocopter AS350B2 took off from Charleston around 11 p.m. after having dropped off a patient around 9:35 p.m. The helicopter was heading northeast to Conway at the time of the crash. The last radio contact was 11:05 p.m. and the helicopter crashed at about 11:30 p.m. It is not known if a thunderstorm which moved through the area a little before the crash was a contributing factor.

According to NTSB records, a similar helicopter operated by Omniflight was damaged on July 2 when it struck steel poles adjacent to the helipad at a hospital. No one was injured in that incident.

In 2006, the NTSB issued a special report concerning issues involved in the increased number of emergency helicopter crashes. According to USA Today, earlier this month NTSB officials urged the government to impose stricter controls on emergency helicopter operators because of last year's 35 deaths between December 2007 and October 2008 - a record number. Since last October there have been three accidents with no deaths until the South Carolina Crash on Friday.

September 29, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Airlink Crash Is Second For Pilot

Category: Plane Crashes

The SA Airlink plane crash in Durban (South Africa) earlier this month which critically injured four people is not the first for Captain Alistair Freeman.

In 2005, he crashed his twin-engine Britten-Norman Islander charter plane into a Durban house. The house was empty at the time, but all six on board the plane, including two children, were injured. Pilot error was listed as the probable cause for that crash. He had only six hours experience in this type of aircraft at the time of the crash.

On Heritage Day, an aircraft piloted by Freeman crashed into a field at a school shortly after takeoff, trapping all three crew members in the wreckage and injuring one person on the ground. Airlink CEO Rodger Foster is insisting Freeman is a competent pilot, stating the company has a good idea of what caused the crash, but is waiting on the analysis of the black boxes for confirmation.

September 22, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Helicopter Crashes in San Diego County

Category: Helicopter Crashes

A Robinson R-44 helicopter crashed in the Guejito Ranch in southern California on Sunday, injuring two people on board.

The Robinson aircraft was manufactured in 2008 and was registered to Gillian Blue GP LLC, a career-coaching business based in Dallas and was based at Mongomery Field. Since the chopper was privately owned, it is thought to be used for pleasure flying.

Guejito Ranch's 22,000 acres of pristine wildlands are home to thousands of species, some of them endangered and protected. Because of it's enviromental purity, it is a popular scenic area to fly over.

The FAA and the NTSB have been flown into the area to determine if the crash was mechanical problems pilot error.

September 16, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Charlotte Businessman Dies in Cirrus SR22 Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crashes

Skipper Beck, a prominent business owner in Charlotte was killed around 7:00 a. m. on Sept. 11 when his single engine Cirrus SR22 crashed in Rock Hill York County Airport. Eye witnesses stated the plane had mechanical problems shortly after takeoff and crashed as he was trying to return to the airport, catching fire upon impact. The Cirrus SR22 G3 Turbo was valued at $525,500.

The plane was registered to Beck Management Group of which Beck was the CEO. The management group had interests in several ventures including the auto business, aviation, and sports. Beck was co-owner of the Charlotte Bobcats.

According to one account, the SR22 by Cirrus Design is extremely popular among purchasers of new aircraft and has become the world's best selling single engine four seat aircraft. It is a high performance more powerful version of the Cirrus SR20 with larger wings, larger fuel capacity and a 310 horsepower engine. Unlike most other high performance aircraft (except the Cessna 400) the SR22 has a non-retractable landing gear. It is also equipped with CAPS - the Cirrus Aircraft Parachute System - parachute which lowers the entire aircraft to the ground in an emergency.

September 11, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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9/11 Lawsuits Still Pending - Want Airline Security Faults Exposed

Category: Plane Crash Lawsuits

Three families of 9/11 victims still have lawsuits pending over airline security on that fateful day. Ninety-eight percent of the families who sued the airlines or their security contractors for negligence have settled out of court.

The remaining families are seeking more than compensation for the loss of their loved ones. They want the evidence gathered in the lawsuits made part of a public archive, claiming no one has done a singularly focused issue on what failed at the checkpoints. The public wants to know what the everyone knew prior to 9/11 including the airlines, security, FAA, and law enforcement and these three families want to see this information made public.

Initially, the court had allowed the defendants in the cases to keep certain sensitive information private during the discovery phase of the lawsuits. The families accuse the defendants of abusing the ruling by declaring almost all the evidence secret. Some of this evidence will be part of the public record when the first of the remaining three cases goes to trial.

The plaintiffs cannot discuss the details of the evidence, they say it is clear the security system of 9/11 totally failed.

With 28 years of experience in aviation law, including handling crashes internationally, Crouse Law Offices in Raleigh, N.C. will be able to handle your concerns competently and efficiently. The successful career of Crouse Law Offices has gained them the respect of major law firms and large aviation manufacturers.

If you or a loved one has been injured or killed in a helicopter or plane incident, please call us at 919-861-0500 or contact us online for a free review of your case.

September 11, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Deadly Arizona Midair Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crashes

According to the FAA, one student was killed on Wednesday south of Phoenix when two small planes were involved in a midair collision. The single-engine Cessna 150 was registered to Christiansen Aviation in Delaware and operated by a Phoenix area flight school. The passenger, another student, was airlifted to an area hospital.

The pilot of the second plane, a single-engine Piper Cherokee, registered to Oxford Training Center Inc., was able to land safely about two miles from the Cessna's crash site. No one on board were injured.

The FAA and the NTSB are investigating the incident.

September 10, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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Five People Killed in Tulsa Plane Crash

Category: Plane Crashes

What was to be a fun filled weekend in Dallas turned tragic for a doctor, his wife, his two children, and a family friend when his single engine Piper Saratoga crashed in West Tulsa on Saturday.

According to the NTSB's preliminary report, the plane struck a guy-wire supporting a 600-foot-tall radio tower in the center of Chandler Park in West Tulsa. The report states the plane struck the cable approximately 150 feet above the ground and about 1,500 feet from the tower. The wreckage was found almost 100 yards from the initial impact on the ground with a 300-foot-long section of the cable in the wreckage.

The plane took off about 10:35 a.me. from Jones Riverside Airport and crashed 7 minutes later.

Further investigation is needed to determine the cause of the crash and will take several months to complete.

September 10, 2009

By Frieda Flyer

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$16.5M Upgrade For Carolinas HealthCare Helicopter Fleet

Category: Helicopter News

The Charlotte-based Carolinas HealthCare System plans to spend $16.5 million within 18 months to upgrade its aging medical helicopter fleet. This is good news in light of the medical helicopter crashes and the need for improved aircraft technology.

Three Eurocopter 135 helicopters will be purchased and upfited as air ambulances. MedCenter Air which is part of the Carolinas Health Care system, made 1,700 transports in 2008. This included rescuing patients from accidents to moving them from one hospital to another.

To defray the costs for the new choppers, the company will sell three of it's Bell 430, purchased between 1996 and 2002 for $4.5 million each. They may keep the fourth Bell helicopter as back-up.